Contributor

Tara Duggan

I’m a San Francisco resident who loves shopping at food co-ops because they reflect the local cuisine and agriculture of a place. My family and I enjoy camping together in Northern California and the Oregon Coast, trips that are often fueled by the delicious wares we discover at food co-ops.

Though eggs are usually relegated to breakfast in this country, in most of the world they’re an around-the-clock food.
My grandfather’s approach to lowering his cholesterol was certainly novel and most likely ill-advised.
Pan sauces are a great chef secret for quick, easy, flavorful meals. Once you know how to sear meat in a pan and make a basic sauce from the drippings, you can apply the skill to almost any kind of protein, from steaks to tofu.
Pureed vegetable soups are an especially delicious way to use up extra produce.
Instant cereals have nothing on the satisfying texture, flavor and nutrition of homemade oats and other hot cereals. And if you think rice and quinoa are just for lunch and dinner, think again.
Meat. Starch. Vegetable. That’s the layout of a typical American meal, with rice, potatoes and pasta in heavy rotation. Tara Duggan mixes things up with a variety of tasty and nutritious whole grains.
We seem to have a complicated relationship with leafy greens. Nutrition experts tell us to eat more of them. Yet many find them somewhat intimidating or have closed the door on them after eating overcooked, mushy greens.
While most people associate outdoor grilling with burgers, hot dogs, and steaks, the grill imparts big flavors to fruits and veggies too.